Monday, November 10, 2008

November 11,



"...a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as 'Armistice Day'."



In 1918, on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day in the eleventh month, the world rejoiced and celebrated the triumph of ending the old world order. After four years of bitter and devastating war, a peace treaty was signed and hope for diplomatic resolutions reigned.



The "war to end all wars" was now over.






Except for the ones that soon followed.





This is a deeply heartfelt thanks for the many peaces that have been fought for and a prayer for those still slightly out of reach.

8 comments:

  1. Peace
    is the abundance
    of deterent.

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  2. Sobering to have lived where the trenches still exist. My husband has visited Flanders Fields and my son cleaned the grave markers of those who died...

    I remember studying the poetry of WWI in English literature class and feeling what was lost in a way the words of my history class had failed to deliver.

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  3. Our wavelength is alive and well....I posted about Armistice Day also.
    This is powerful and poignant.

    Peace,
    Lydia

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  4. ~Style~
    is the grace
    of winged flight
    that connects words
    to the heart.

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  5. Thanks to all for your comments. This day takes on so much more meaning for me as I get older and gain some sense.
    jfrancis, I always love to see how you will interpret my posts and those of others. As always, well-played, my friend:>)

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  6. What a lovely post. Thank you.

    Thank you, too, for creating just a bit more peace in my world with your kind comment on my blog.

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  7. Since I'm viral, though not flu-like, did you know that the Spanish Flu may have had something to do with WWII? This theory is outlined in The Great Influenza which talks about how the flu in 1918/1919 played in the peace talks. Not feeling well from effects of influenza and in a rush to peace, Woodrow Wilson agreed to the harsh terms set out in the Treaty of Versailles. This may have set the groundwork for WWII. I loved that book, The Great Influenza. It's worth reading just for the insight into the dawn of modern medicine.

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  8. Thank you for the lovely post.
    Blessings and peace to us all.

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Hey, thanks for your thoughts and your time:>)