Thursday, October 30, 2008

"People Get Ready,

there's a train a-coming. don't need no ticket, you just get on board."


Went to a funeral today, my hubby's co-worker, dead at age 54. What once sounded old to me has changed over the years I realized as I stood with our friends in the early afternoon light on this beautiful golden October day and watched the casket being placed into the hearst.
Because we are nurses, doctors, respiratory therapists and we daily watch the current of morbidity, mortality pass by us it's easy to believe that we are safe on dry land protected from those chilling waters. But life is what it is. No more, no less.

Few words of comfort for the group gathered here today. Michael had collapsed at work and the resuscitation attempts were done by those who knew and loved him well. "All the King's horses and all the King's men..." During the service I had the uncomfortable feeling of being at the losing end in a game of Tug of War and the priest knew he was dragging us all through this towards him yet unable to answer our unspoken question, "Why?"

"Life is eternal and love is immortal; and death is only a horizon, and a horizon is nothing save the limit of our sight."—Rossiter W. Raymond.


Please note: photo by Jacken Hack

5 comments:

  1. A lovely and loving post.

    Now I must find the song on You Tube because I love it and NEED to hear it after your tantalizing reminder of it.

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  2. The casket___
    it contained
    nothing of value,
    the spirit has departed,
    the memories linger
    and power the hearts
    left behind.

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  3. What a nice post. It's always difficult to think about our own mortality. I believe life is a journey and death is a part of it. I don't know what's at this journey's end, but I'm not really afraid to face it. Nor am I anxious to get there. Time.

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  4. Lovely. Dealth is not the end, I believe that with all my heart.

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  5. I don't know what I believe about death, except I'd rather collapse in my prime than die the slow agonizing deaths I've witnessed in my life time.

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Hey, thanks for your thoughts and your time:>)